Song to Song

2017

Drama  Music  Romance  

Synopsis


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June 17, 2017 at 10:20 pm

Cast

Natalie Portman as n Rhondann
Michael Fassbender as n Cooknn
Rooney Mara as n Fayenn
Ryan Gosling as n BVnn
720p 1080p
946.25 MB
n 1280*720 n
n English n
n R n
n 23.976 fps n
n 2hr 9 min n
P/S 6 / 213
1.96 GB
n 1920*1080 n
n English n
n R n
n 23.976 fps n
n 2hr 9 min n
P/S 13 / 116

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Diand 9 / 10

Lightness and weight

In philosophy both Parmenides and Heraclitus saw lightness as the positive side of the lightness-weight dichotomy. Later, the writer Italo Calvino took the same position. But it was Milan Kundera who stated it as a dilemma framed in Nietzsche's concept of the eternal return: a heavy burden can crush us, but the heavier the burden, the more real and truthful our lives become. Malick clearly takes on the latter position in this movie, which was originally more aptly titled Weightless. This theme is also connected to Heidegger's Man being called back in self-awareness and fulfillment by answering introspective questions about his existence.Song to song is an exploration of love and ambition set against the Austin music scene. Especially around the theme of love the movie makes interesting observations: That true love is only possible by isolating yourself from the fake world (of music and money here), that walls are built around you inhibiting you from finding real love. Another observation is that early in life you love everyone, but ultimately your awareness, society, and religion lets you end up with one true love, unable to love others any more.The notion Malick makes about love is the romantic character of love itself, romantic not in the sense we nowadays attach to it, but the original meaning as an unattainable ideal, combined with adoration of nature and emphasis on the individual and its intense emotions, the latter creating beauty and experience. Romanticism was mainly a reaction to industrialization and urban sprawl: All Malick movies have shots of urban landscapes and nature scenes; they look for beauty in that nature and have a preference for searching for intuition instead of filming fixed storyboards.The story however develops in a non-romantic direction: Where in the quintessential novel of the romantic (or more precisely Sturm und Drang) movement the main male character shoots himself after being rejected by the woman he loves (Goethe's Die Leiden des jungen Werthers), Malick replaces that hopelessness with a man who commits adultery, has regrets and is punished and tested by the woman he loves who commits far more and extremer adulterous acts.Malick uses again a naturalistic style of filming, adding unscripted moments that occur during the movie shoot. Some footage is shot at the Austin City Limits festival and short interviews with John Lydon and Iggy Pop are included. The state of Texas features prominently: a key scene is before a Texaco gas station for example, but overall it is the unusual, non-clichéd beauty of both nature and the built-up Texan landscape that is well captured by Lubezki's camera, making effective use of wide camera angles. It also feels less slow and has more snappy cuts than Knight of Cups, which will be a relief for many I guess. The editing by a team of 8 (!) editors is however inconsistent and one of the weaknesses of the movie.Two actresses in the movie have in my opinion the capability to give this an extra level, to give it real character depth acting on multiple levels in order to convey the emotions Malick's movies are oddly enough often lacking despite aiming for them: Portman and Blanchett. They are so underused and reduced to cardboard characters that it can almost be called a shame.What struck me also about this movie is how conservative and deeply religious Malick's world view is: He clearly roots for Patti Smith's love story she tells in the movie for example, and sees the other musicians and portrays them as lost souls. In Song to song the woman repents, but the man only regrets. I see a parallel here with Tarkovsky's movies, which show the same religious, conservative world view. It brings up an odd observation: These two movie geniuses shatter the notion that true art can nowadays only be made by free souls, their art more in line with church-supported art like it used to be (Note: See The Tree of Life explanation by Bishop Barron).Von Trier once remarked that he in effect makes the same movie over and over again, and Malick has come to that same point now. He has perfected his storytelling skills, hides the movie in the images and by editing, uses time and space shifting, sees salvation in nature (the element of water is effectively used here), adds autobiographical elements (music, adultery, suicide, father-son relation, ambition), so Radegund can hopefully be the creative destruction many now hope for.

Reviewed by Paul Allaer 9 / 10

Pretentious crap seems mostly improvised

"Song to Song" (2017 release; 129 min.) brings the story of Faye. As the movie opens, we hear Faye announce in voice over "I went through a period where sex had to be violent", and with that we are off. Fay seems to have a relationship with both BV (a budding musician) and Cook (a record executive). We see them at various Austin landmarks and outdoor shows (ACL Music Festival, I assume). At this point we are about 10-15 min. into the movie, you'll just have to see for yourself how it all plays out.Couple of comments: this is the latest movie from writer-director Terrence Malick, Here he follows a path that s very similar of his previous film "Knight of Cups": essentially an abstract film about relationships, with not much dialogue but plenty of voice-over thoughts ("Any experience is better than no experience" and "I went along like someone in a dream", just to give you a glimpse). This movie was actually shot in 2011-12, and is only now seeing the light of day. Rumor has it that Malick had 8 hours of film which he had to cut down to this final version, just over 2 hrs., and when you are watching it, it does feel like we skip from scene to scene without any sense or purpose. As for the lead actors (Rooney Mara as Faye, Ryan Gosling as BV, Michael Fassbender as Cook; Natalie Portman appears about a half hour into the movie for some scenes; yet later Cate Blanchett, as a fling of BV, makes her entrance), it feels like most of what they are doing seems improvised. Not much of it makes sense or is coherent in any way, shape or form. Tons of cameos from the music world (RHCP, Iggy Pop, Patti Smith, Johnny Lydon, etc., mostly in a blink and you'll miss it moment). As a long-time fan and admirer of Terrence Malick, it pains me to tell you that, on the heels of the so-so Knight of Cups, this is even worse. Given the all-star ensemble cast, what a colossal waste of talent all around! "Song to Song" opened this weekend at my local art-house theater here in Cincinnati, and given who all was involved in this production, I couldn't wait to see it. The Saturday matinée screening where I saw this at was attended okay but not great. "Song to Song" is not a movie that I can recommend to anyone, although there may be some curiosity about this film, given the all-star cast attached to it. Viewer beware! (*UPDATE* The movie sank like a stone at the box office, and disappeared after just one week from the theater here in Cincinnati.)

Reviewed by rockman182 9 / 10

Song to Song (2017)

What a cinematic experience. If you know me well, you know I love Terrence Malick's work. It wasn't always that way, I had to revisit some of his work to really appreciate what he brings to cinema. Song to Song may have been the film I was most hyped for in 2017, seeing as my favorite actor and actress (Ryan Gosling and Rooney Mara) were finally working together and teaming up with a visionary like Malick. I know this film will divide and polarize viewers but I think if you love cinema and Malick's style (especially his last few films) you will enjoy this work.The film is mostly about a couple of musicians who fall for each other and their captivating connection. Betrayal, infidelity, and other humanly circumstances get in the way of their relationship but then they eventually drift apart and find their way to each other. First off, this film has an excellent cast. The four of the top billed cast are immensely talented and this film has a number of satisfying musical cameos. Just like with Tree of Life and Knight of Cups the film uses camera-work that is shifty, montage-like, personal, and with quick cuts. There is use of fish-eye lens, first person, behind the head shots, you name it. The cinematography at times is absolutely gorgeous; the film is as close to visual art as you can get. And this is no surprise because its quintessential Malick.Narrative structure of the film is coherent despite the cutting and style of storytelling. Its not at ll hard to follow and I was engaged from the get go, it comes down to personal taste. I can imagine a casual moviegoer to get frustrated with the structure and lack of straightforward progression. I found the intricacies of the interactions between the characters so fascinating and thought there was real compatibility between the cast members. I love Rooney Mara so much and her beauty was so crisp in every scene she was in. The characters in this film experience a range of human emotions throughout and its a wonder to behold.Many may find the film to be pretentious in its attempt to be profound. I was perfectly fine with the inner monologues of the characters, much like with Malick's recent films. I still think Tree of Life is his best masterpiece but this film is probably the next of his filmography that I feel a strong connection with. I am glad I experienced this film as soon as possible and wish it would get the Criterion treatment much like some of Malick's other work.9/10

Reviewed by vaniamendes 9 / 10

Way too many close-ups of Mara's face

My God I am all here for a great experimental, artistic movie, but this was just boring. Despite all the great cinematography, the message from this movie could be told in 30 minutes and was explored so much better in another 100 movies. The scene with Holly Hunter in the parking lot was the best one, but it only lasted a few seconds. Besides that, it was just an accumulation of beautiful faces flerting together (good acting nonetheless). And where was the music? The music could have saved the movie. Filming the film at a festival and putting on some old music legends doesn't do the job.

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